Home Culture Part 4: Wellness for All

Wellness is a balance of the external and internal environments of a person

Through this series, we have identified our values, taken a look at our personalities, and reviewed how trust is built between people. This post will put it all together and discuss elements of a home filled with wellness.

A household that operates in full wellness is functioning with authenticity while providing feelings of belonging. The household’s environment ensures everyone’s needs are met, and they are safe to be their authentic self.

“Wellness is not the absence of adversities, but intentionally designing the conditions of an environment to support optimal functioning.” – Jeanine Fitzgerald.

The importance of identifying household values is that the family can get on the same page and aim in the same direction. By understanding these values, a family can align its short and long-term actions to them. A family can also correct or eliminate any areas of non-alignment.

By understanding our own nature (personality) and the nature of the other members of our home, we can ensure that we develop a deep connection. When we develop a deep connection with each other, we honor their authenticity while providing a sense of belonging (remember: people gravitate to where they feel most acknowledged and accepted). Out of this, each member of the family can derive meaning and a purpose for their life. 

Values, personality identification, and trust-building are all internal elements of wellness. What about the external? 

What is the perfect physical home environment? There is no perfect recipe that works for all households. In fact, every home will have its own ingredients for success and wellness. Here are some tips that can help you build an environment that draws out the best in its members:

  • D/I personalities are often on the move. Look to create areas of open space so flowing movement can happen. 
  • S/C personalities? Look to create areas where concentration and solitude can be found.
  • Keep the environment flexible as the house should change with the changing needs of the individuals. My wife and I have had four living room set-up changes since our kids were born (oldest is 7).
  • Artwork, decorations, and themed rooms should all align with the values of the household. By creating visual harmony, we subtly reinforce household values and create an appropriate tone for day-to-day living.
  • Work through your house’s rooms and analyze your stuff (furniture, decorations, and space usage). Remove items that hold no value or get in the way of optimal wellness—less stuff=more freedom.
  • Allow your kids to create their own room design. This is a fun activity where kids can figure out what they like best. Allow them to change often to test things out. 

Hopefully, this series has provided some value for you. Keep in mind that life and parenting are not games where perfection can be achieved. Life and parenting are more about constant discovery and continuous learning. By using your values as guidance and cultivating your relationships, you can develop strong resiliency and wellness of all home members.

Be well

-MJ

Photo by Michal Parzuchowski via Unsplash

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